Let’s move to King’s Cross, London: a most astonishing transformation

Fragments of a less salubrious past hold on for dear life amid the swank

What’s going for it? Of all the remarkable transformations in supergentrified London, that of King’s Cross is the most astonishing. I can just remember what it was, dim memories of jigging at its warehouse clubs in the 90s. Before my time, there’s always Mona Lisa (the film) and reruns of The Sweeney to recreate the area’s prostitution and darkness, its dripping railway arches and encrusted tenements. Railway stations used to blight areas, their comings and goings attracting the kind of untrustworthy spivs who terrorise the older women in The Ladykillers. Nowadays they’re “hubs”, their sleek bars and delis paused in by commuters off to Potters Bar, their luxury apartments paused in by tech millionaires off to Singapore. We all come and go these days. Fragments of a less salubrious past, though, remain, holding on for dear life amid the swank, like Housman’s radical bookshop and the glorious Camley Street nature reserve, offering alternative utopias had history here taken a different path.

The case against The thundering traffic and choking pollution of Euston and Pentonville roads. When Google’s HQ is finished, expect the neighbourhood’s transformation to be complete. Eyewateringly expensive, mostly.

Source: FS – All – Economy – News 2
Let’s move to King’s Cross, London: a most astonishing transformation